Cruising the Cambrian Coast

Bristol style

Continuing the progress of the party which was following the Crosville D94 route through the middle of Wales on a particularly appropriate and authentic vehicle of the 1980s, we last looked at the little village of Llandderfel by the Dee. From there we headed for Dolgellau via Bala. Bala is a busy ribbon along the A494 and so is not a good place to stop when there is tourist traffic. A bus stopped on the carriageway can cause tailbacks and the resulting photos are correspondingly cluttered. On quiet days pleasant views can be had.

At Dolgellau we paused in Eldon Square where the main bus stop for the town can be found. On sunny days the square is unfavourably oriented and the sun will spoil your pictures… as it did on this particular day, so we took ERG280 on a lap of honour around the town’s little one-way system to catch the sun in the right direction. The day’s variable lighting is evident in this view of what English people call Smithfield Street. Looks like some sort of tragic incident occurred here the previous Christmas.

ERG280 in the spotlight entering Dolgellau along Ffos-y-Felin

After Dolgellau we made our way along the tricky narrow road on the north bank of the Mawddach estuary to the terminus of the D94 at Barmouth. Sadly, we found that the bus terminus has been moved from its traditional park along the wall of the Cambrian Coast railway line near to the level crossing [as featured in hundreds of photos down the years]. There is a replacement bus parking area but with a rather bland backdrop of seaside flats that I won’t bore you with. It was a useful lunch stop before we moved along gently via the coast road northwards towards Blaenau Ffestiniog.

In the 1980s Crosville’s YFM-L batch of REs, of which ERG280 is evidently one, became concentrated in West Wales. One or two could often be found operating out of Dolgellau and its outstations at Barmouth and Tywyn. There was a good chance of one on the R38 which operated between Barmouth and Maentwrog, a tiny village situated at an important confluence of strategic routes at the north end of Cardigan Bay. The bus interchange was at the top of the hill beyond the village of Maentwrog at Tan y Bwlch, outside the Oakeley Arms pub. Up on the hillside above is Tan y Bwlch station on the Ffestiniog Railway. I once had the idea of taking a bus up there [as Crosville used to in the 1970s with their Bristol SCs based at Blaenau] but when I wrote to the Ffestiniog Railway asking whether it was possible to turn a bus at the station in the 2000s, I received a rather stern reply warning me not to try.

So after a seaside lunch of fish and chips we were on our way north. Beyond Harlech it was too good a location not to pull over for a photo with the hilltop castle looming behind in peculiar light. The atmosphere provided some texture in the background too, which was nice.

Those poles should be edited out really

Looks like the D94 got a bit lost there but in truth we didn’t have a destination on the blind to use. We had more luck on arrival at Maentwrog.

Scene of many a Crosville photo, “Maentwrog Interchange”

ERG280, though strictly a Wrexham bus, looks at home here. Buses came from Pwllheli, Porthmadog, Dolgellau, Barmouth and Blaenau Ffestiniog and all those bases had members of this batch on allocation at one time or another. Many an MW, RE or LH came by, SCs too, though I never saw one in service in Wales through being too young and I haven’t seen one photographed here.

I have quite a few shots of venerable Crosville vehicles at Maentwrog but probably the most remarkable was Crewe’s SRG191 which went on holiday in West Wales in the summer of 1985 before going home to die. I rode it along the same route we followed in ERG280 but in July 1985 when it was operating out of Barmouth.

SRG191 at the Oakeley arms on 25th July 1985

SRG191 operated variously out of Dolgellau, Barmouth, Blaenau Ffestiniog, Pwllheli [and Porthmadog outstation] and Holyhead [at least] in 1985. I have a photo of it at Aberystwyth working in from Dolgellau. After gallivanting around Wales all summer it was back at Crewe by the winter. All the remaining Crewe dual door SRGs were withdrawn when the new EOGs entered service on the Coastliner service on the first Sunday of 1986. The ENLs displaced from the L1 were sent to Cheshire, mostly Crewe but also Northwich as I remember.

I will leave you with a link to flickr where a few photos of Maentwrog over the years are hosted, including one of sister ERG277.

Once is never enough

You may remember a short while ago my recent and very brief stop at Llandderfel in pursuit of a Lloyds of Machynlleth Scania…

Lloyds on Traws Cymru T3 at Llandderfel

…and how I had accumulated photos of Crosville REs at the same location over the years. I present this evening some photos taken when a small group of intrepid enthusiasts took a preserved Crosville RE along the old D94 route which is now the T3 on which Lloyds operate.

Crosville dual purpose Bristol RELL6G ERG280 is a familiar sight on the road at transport events and has been used for a few private outings over the years. In its day it was allocated to Wrexham depot and, though not a regular performer on the D94 in my experience, I am sure that it must have operated the service many times during its long life at Wrexham. In September 2008 we followed the D94 route to the sea at Barmouth from Wrexham railway station, which was the official starting point of many journeys back in the day. The service was joined up from several shorter routes to replace the Ruabon to Barmouth railway service in the 1960s after the infamous Beeching cuts.

I read recently that the route was 67 miles from end to end and would be a full day’s work when a driver did a round trip.

In my other piece on this part of the world I mentioned that I used to ask the driver to allow me to leave the bus at the war memorial while the bus ran to the village and back, when I would get a picture of the approaching bus and get back on. On the occasion of the 2008 visit, there was no need for that because we were in control of events… so to cover the route in full I guided the bus into the village.

Llandderfel village square is no longer the official stop!

Back in the 1980s the bus would turn round in the square and, on reversing, would be unfavourably oriented for photography, with the sun behind. As can be seen here, I have done my best with strong sunlight coming from the left but the shadows spoil the shot somewhat. There was another problem… unknown to the party on the bus, the bus stop in Llandderfel had been moved away from the village to the road behind, with a turning circle provided up the hill beyond. This meant that motorists had no need to keep the square clear for buses every day and we had parked cars to contend with.

Ultimately, the blue car seen here belonged to hill walkers who were out and about, making it impossible for the bus to turn right when reversed. The shrubbery seen to the left of the frame is adjacent to a wall on the bank of the River Dee which was closer to the bus than it may appear here. There was nothing else but to edge forward and then reverse out of the village the way we came in, to the bewilderment of the few souls milling around.

ERG280 returning from the turning point now provided at Llandderfel

After making use of the new turning circle we were free to head back to the war memorial.

ERG280 on its return to Llandderfel war memorial

Though the sun is more favourable here, there are still strong shadows in summer to contend with. We got the shot anyway.

Corwen depot’s regular performer in 1985, ERG276

ERG280 went all the way to Barmouth that morning calling at Dolgellau along the way. There is more to relate but a break is compulsory at Barmouth [unless operating out of Dolgellau or Corwen] so this will be in another episode. If you have any photos or memories of the D94 or its successor services, feel free to add comments or links below.